Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Fourth UK Edition (WPPSI-IV UK)

Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Fourth UK Edition (WPPSI-IV UK)

Assessment Summary

The Wechsler Preschool & Primary Scale of Intelligence - Fourth UK Edition (WPPSI-IV UK) is an innovative, reliable and valid measure of cognitive development for young children and is often used as part of the entrance process for students identified as potentially gifted and talented.

The WPPSI™-IV is an individually administered intelligence test that assesses a child’s current cognitive abilities in both verbal and nonverbal areas for children between the ages of 2 years 6 months to 7 years and 7 months. This is a change from the WPPSI™-III, which was administered to children 2 years 6 months to 7 years and 3 months. Younger children take fewer subtests than older children.

Fees

£495


Age Group

Age 2 years 6 months to 7 years

 

This assessment is useful to:

The WPPSI can be used in several ways, for example:

  • As an assessment of general intellectual functioning.
  • As part of an assessment to identify intellectual giftedness.
  • To identify cognitive delay and learning difficulties.

The clinical utility of the WPPSI-III can be improved and a richer picture of general function achieved when combined with other assessments. For example, when paired with the Children’s Memory Scale, a measure of learning and memory functioning in children or the WIAT 2,  a measure of academic achievement, information can be gained on both cognitive ability and academic achievement in young children. Combinations such as these would potentially be of use in educational settings and inform educational interventions. A further potentially useful pairing includes the used of the Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System as this pairing can result in information on cognitive and adaptive functioning, both of which are required for a proper diagnosis of learning difficulties.

 

How we administer the assessment

The Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence consist of 14 subtests. They are designated as one of three types: core, supplemental, or optional. The core subtests are required for the computation of the Verbal, Performance, and Full Scale IQ. The supplemental subtests provide additional information about cognitive abilities or can be used as replacement for inappropriate subtests. The optional subtests provide additional information about cognitive functioning.

  • Block Design - while viewing a constructed model or a picture in a stimulus book, the child uses one- or two-colour blocks to re-create the design within a specified time limit.
  • Information - for Picture Items, the child responds to a question by choosing a picture from four response options. For Verbal Items, the child answers questions that address a broad range of general knowledge topics.
  • Matrix Reasoning - the child looks at an incomplete matrix and selects the missing portion from 4 or 5 response options.
  • Vocabulary - for Picture Items, the child names pictures that are displayed in a stimulus book. For Verbal Items, the child gives definitions for words that the examiner reads aloud.
  • Picture Concepts - the child is presented with two or three rows of pictures and chooses one picture from each row to form a group with a common characteristic.
  • Symbol Search - the child scans a search group and indicates whether a target symbol matches any of the symbols in the search group.
  • Word Reasoning- the child is asked to identify the common concept being described in a series of increasingly specific clues.
  • Coding - the child copies symbols that are paired with simple geometric shapes. Using a key, the child draws each symbol in its corresponding shape.
  • Comprehension - the child answers questions based on his or her understanding of general principles and social situations.
  • Picture Completion - the child views a picture and then points to or names the important missing part.
  • Similarities - the child is read an incomplete sentence containing two concepts that share a common characteristic. The child is asked to complete the sentence by providing a response that reflects the shared characteristic.
  • Receptive Vocabulary - the child looks at a group of four pictures and points to the one the examiner names aloud.
  • Object Assembly - the child is presented with the pieces of a puzzle in a standard arrangement and fits the pieces together to form a meaningful whole within 90 seconds.
  • Picture Naming - the child names pictures that are displayed in a stimulus book.